The Queen attends London Fashion Week for the first time

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Queen Elizabeth II made her first ever appearance at London Fashion Week last week, watching the catwalk show of designer Richard Quinn and presenting him with the first award in her name for British Design.

The Queen was seated in the front row for the show, next to editor of American Vogue, Anna Wintour. She wore a pale blue tweed dress by Angela Kelly with a matching jacket adorned with Swarovski crystals.

The Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design was created to recognise the role the fashion industry plays in society and diplomacy and will be presented each year to an emerging designer who has demonstrated talent and originality while upholding values such as serving the community or sustainable policies.

While presenting the award the Queen said: “From the tweed of the Hebrides to Nottingham lace, and of course Carnaby Street, our fashion industry has been renowned for outstanding craftsmanship for many years, and continues to produce world-class textiles and cutting edge, practical designs. As a tribute to the industry, and as my legacy to all those who have contributed to British fashion, I would like to present this award for new, young talent.”

First recipient of the award, Richard Quinn, is a recent graduate of Central Saint Martins and started his own label in 2016. He’s worked for Christian Dior, Michael van der Ham and Richard James and is known for combining clashing prints with classic silhouettes.

Quinn will work with printing brand Epson this season to create textile designs with the latest digital print technology using Epson’s Surecolor system.
First recipient of the award, Richard Quinn, is a recent graduate of Central Saint Martins and started his own label in 2016. He’s worked for Christian Dior, Michael van der Ham and Richard James and is known for combining clashing prints with classic silhouettes.

Quinn will work with printing brand Epson this season to create textile designs with the latest digital print technology using Epson’s Surecolor system.